Sep
 08
 2017



Christopher

Hello,

Welcome to this end-of-the-week edition of The Spin from New York where Fashion Week is now in full swing. Today we'll explore how two fashion rivals have teamed up to protect their models, hear how yet another retailer has gone belly up and learn why increased spending doesn't always mean good economic news. Enjoy the read and your weekend. I'll see you again on Monday. Best, Christopher



brands

Minding models. Competing luxury conglomerates LVMH and Kering joined forces and co-announced on Wednesday that they are both banning size zero models as well as those under age 16 from their brands' advertisements and runway shows. Their newly implemented model charter states that female models cannot be below French size 34 and that males must be size 44 or above. The new rules also state that teen models cannot work between 10pm and 6am and must be accompanied by a guardian or chaperone.



Anna expands. American designer Anna Sui is growing her fashion empire with two new collaborative collections that she has just unveiled. She kicked off New York Fashion Week last night with a party celebrating her collection for Macy's in-house INC International Concepts brand, which is already available in selected Macy's stores and online. In addition, she has partnered with PBteen, the teenage division of Pottery Barn, and made a new furniture line for adolescent girls (gallery).





retail

Topshop topples in NZ. Top Retail, the franchise that has run New Zealand's two Topshop and Topman stores since it introduced them there three years ago, has been placed into receivership . The two Kiwi Topshop locations, in Auckland and Wellington, remain open for now but some are already predicting their forthcoming closures. Topshop's Australian franchise also tanked in May but four of its stores there remain open after Topshop's parent company Arcadia Group bought back part of the business.





markets

Spending rises in the U.K.... A weaker pound and rising prices actually caused consumer spending at British retailers to increase by 2 percent in August, the largest spike in two years, according to a just released study. While increased numbers are generally positive this one is not, as it is probably reflects more foreign tourists shopping in the U.K. and more natives taking "staycations" due to a debilitated pound. Another study by the British Retail Consortium also found a rise in spending and warned that this was not good news.



...and slows in America. The National Retail Federation, the largest retail trade group in the USA, has lowered its forecast of retail sales for the year after reviewing newly revised government data. The organization now projects (paywall) that U.S. retail sales will grow 3.2 to 3.8 percent in 2017 instead of its previous call of 3.7 to 4.2 percent. NRF said that weaker spending in the first quarter and decelerating inflation caused it to adjust the numbers.



Asia's recycling woes. The recycled textile industry is facing serious problems in Asia. Panipat which is the Indian capital of recycled fabrics with 150 to 200 mills that turn castoff clothing into new fibers, has seen a dramatic downturn in demand, has mostly unregulated working conditions and is having problems keeping up with modern technology. In addition, China's recent ban of imported textile scraps to supposedly reduce pollution is viewed by some to be a major roadblock in the advancement of textile recycling.





people

Adieu to J.Crew Somsack Sikhounmuong, who replaced Jenna Lyons as creative director of J.Crew in April, is leaving the company. He has worked there for the past 16 years and is the latest high-profile name to depart the struggling label/retailer in recent months. A J.Crew spokesperson said that Sikhounmuong will not be replaced and that the brand's overall creative vision instead would be handled by a team of design staff who are already employed there.



Goodbye, Graydon. Graydon Carter, who has served as editor in chief of Vanity Fair for 25 years, announced yesterday that he will be leaving the Condé Nast title at the end of the year. His post-departure plans include a six-month "recharge" in France followed by an official announcement of his next venture.







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